oursin: Books stacked on shelves, piled up on floor, rocking chair in foreground (books)
[personal profile] oursin

10 Famous Book Hoarders

(I think we may contest the term 'hoarders' for people with lotsaboox, hmmmm?)

In most of those cases I think we do see a real love of books, though I'm not sure about Hearst and whether 'ostentation' was not on his mind rather than use?

In some cases those appear to be the personal libraries that have fetched up in public collections, and one wonders whether there was a certain amount of weeding and selection at the point of accession. (I'm not saying that Houdini or Arendt also had vast collections of pulp westerns or school stories or whatever, but I'm not ruling out that choices were made at some point.)

And indeed, while calling your private collection 'the Library of the History of Human Imagination' is indeed quite a long way along the pretentiousness scale, I look at that picture: 'It has three levels, a glass bridge, floating platforms' and feel a certain covetousness.

And even if it's ponceyness turned up to 11, it's not as cringe-making as this, which crossed my radar pretty much on the same day: Meet The App That Revolutionized Book Reading For 2 Million People

We sort through the approximately 2,200,000 books published worldwide to find the best nonfiction books out there. Then, our subject specialists, writers, and editors identify the key ideas from each of these hand-selected books and transform them into smart, useful summaries of insights we lovingly polish and refine until they are nothing but the absolute most essential elements of the writer’s main ideas. We do the filtering for you, then we share those ideas with you the way your dream-friend would.
Tonstant Weader called for a stiff drink.

*'Twenty-two acknowledged concubines, and a library of sixty-two thousand volumes, attested the variety of his [Gordian II's] inclinations; and from the productions which he left behind him, it appears that the former as well as the latter were designed for use rather than for ostentation.' Edward Gibbon, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Vol I.

Ridiculous comment of the day

Jun. 26th, 2017 03:24 am
conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly
In response to this article:

White people are the only reason schools ever desegregated in the first place, so making broad generalizations here doesn't work.

0.0

That's some impressive ignorance there. I just... I don't even... wow. Thurgood Marshall must be absolutely spinning in his grave.
conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly
we certainly have a lot of classic cars. Not just old cars, but old in very good condition and the sort that even people with no real knowledge of cars (hi!) can say "Wow, that's a nice looking car!" over.

Yesterday when I walked the dogs with Eva, we passed one such car with a front bench seat.

Me: That's a nice car!
Eva: It's weird, it doesn't even have two seats in the front.
Eva: Wait, it has three seats. COOL! So you can have six people in the car! Why don't they do that now?

I didn't know the answer, but here it is. They were an option for much longer than I thought! I'd assumed they were regulated away, but apparently not. Whodathunk? (Random tangent - I wonder which is more common in English, "whodathunk" or "whodathunkit"? Google ngram viewer is completely unhelpful here.)

Anyway, today I saw three nice Cadillacs from the 50s or 60s... though given that they were all together, there was probably a thing they were going to. And last week I ran across an Oldsmobile that I'm pretty sure is from the 40s.

So as you can see, we do have a lot of classic cars in this neighborhood that you might randomly run across.

**********************


Chatter in the deep brain spurs empathy in rats

The day after Sweden switched from driving on the left to driving on the right, 1967 (LOL!)

'50s Ladies in Kodachromes: Looking Back to Women Fashion Over 60 Years Ago

Chickens may illuminate how humans developed sharp daylight vision

The story behind the dark Times Square subway poem (Yo, that's a really long tunnel, btw.)

Mosul celebrates first Eid without Islamic State in years (I didn't know henna was an Iraqi thing, but judging from those pictures I guess so...?)

Eid al-Fitr: What you need to know (Starting this year, NYC schools take off for Eid, but they're doing it tomorrow. And then I think school ends Wednesday. This is typical of the NYC school system. It'd make just as much sense to not take those two random days off in June and then end the year last Friday, but noooooooo. Don't know why I'm complaining, I don't have to deal with that nonsense, anyway.)

Muslims in Asia pray for peace as Ramadan holy month ends (There is a girl in one of those pictures wearing a red hijab with white polka dots and Minnie Mouse ears. It is so adorable, it must be seen to be believed.)

A Middle Eastern Spin On A Classic Latino Dessert: Rose Cardamom Tres Leches (Tres Leches is apparently quite popular in Turkey nowadays anyway.)

This Common Butterfly Has an Extraordinary Sex Life (Extraordinary and a little stomach-churning.)

Famous Women Have Been Defying Gender Norms and Rocking Menswear for Years

Gay pride parades sound a note of resistance - and face some

Stories About Disability Don’t Have to Be Sad

Planes aren’t the only things with wings buzzing at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base.

The base was the first military installation to earn the “Bee City USA” designation: The number of pollinator honey bees swarming around hives has flourished five fold in two years as the bees indulge in abundant food, water and nesting sites, officials say.

Philippine, Vietnam navies play sports on South China Sea island

The decline of electric guitar

Websites and apps are designed for compulsion, even addiction. Should the net be regulated like drugs or casinos?

Joe Arpaio on trial over immigration actions echoing Trump's

A Battle Over Prayer in Schools Tests Canada’s Multiculturalism

A risky fix to repair a city's gutted streetlight grid

The TSA is going to look through your books but promises not to notice what you're reading (When we talk about things that we should never have accepted as normal, the TSA and their shenanigans is top of the list.)

Journalists Condemn Trump Press Restrictions, But Don’t Expect Them To Boycott Briefings

Two factories Donald Trump bragged about saving are now laying off workers

Canadian leaders have given up on Trump—so now they're going around him

Shifting Dollars From Poor to Rich Is a Key Part of the Senate Health Bill (No shit.)

Pro-Trump group's health care offensive warns GOP senators to get in line

The Danger of Yemen's Secret Prisons (Content note: like all descriptions of torture, this is nauseating)
conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly
The first link that popped up on Google is no longer functional, and it doesn't work at archive.org either. The correct link now is https://theauthoritarians.org/

That's easy to remember!

Culinary

Jun. 25th, 2017 08:47 pm
oursin: Frontispiece from C17th household manual (Accomplisht Lady)
[personal profile] oursin

During the week, baked a loaf of the Shipton Mill 3 Malts and Sunflower Organic Brown Flour.

Friday supper: Gujerati khichchari - absentmindedly used ground cumin rather than cumin seed but I don't think the effect was disastrous.

Saturday breakfast rolls: the adaptable soft rolls recipe, 2:2:1 strong white/wholemeal/dark rye flours with maple sugar and sour cherries.

Today's lunch: redfish fillets rubbed with Cajun seasoning, brushed with milk and egg and coated in panko crumbs, panfried in olive oil, served with steamed samphire tossed in butter and baby leeks healthy-grilled in avocado oil and splashed with gooseberry vinegar.

mrissa: (Default)
[personal profile] mrissa

Originally published at Novel Gazing Redux. You can comment here or there.

A friend asked me for this blog post, and I really haven’t been feeling the blogging lately, so here we go, a way into it by talking to a specific person.

A lot of people do pacing instinctively, sometimes synaesthetically. This is why you’ll hear metaphors like an unbalanced washing machine, a car with a flat tire–things where the rhythm is off, things where the story is going THUMPa THUMPa THUMPa. If you have that feeling for it, if you have that instinct, hurrah! Lucky you. If not, here are some other ways to spot broken pacing.

Ask an external reader. If they are bored in some sections, the pacing is probably breaking down. (Also boredom, who wants it.) Also, if they can spot the scenes that are the most important to the writer, that’s no good–obviously there will be things like the climax of the piece that are important scenes, but you don’t want to have a lot of scenes that are obviously un-important. If the reader feels like a scene doesn’t matter to you and they’re right, take it out and find another way to do the thing it’s doing. If they’re wrong and it really is important to you? Probably a pacing problem.

Track things! Track all the things. Okay, not all. But any of the things. Figure out what elements are showing up in each scene, what each scene is doing. You can do this with characters. You can do it with things like description/action/dialog balance. You can do it with objects that are touchstones to your plot. You can do it with locations. Anything you are wanting to pull through the book and balance, you can track, sometimes with color. Put it on notecards, print it out in tiny font and highlight it, just do a chapter list in a different file: who is in Chapter 1 with the protag(s). Who is in Chapter 2. Or: where does the Axe of Awesomeness show up first, where does it show up again, how long is it between spottings of the Major Macguffin. Has the reader had time to forget about it or think it is no longer important or get distracted by the Minor Macguffin. Has the Shiny Red Herring come up often enough? Track it in red to see where it is swimming. Is there a love story? If there is supposed to be a love story but you are not seeing Captain Swoonypants between Chapter 2 and Chapter 13, the pants: they will not be swooning. That is what we call a major sag in the pacing. (And/or in the pants.) Negative relationship stuff, too: that distance between a fight and the next appearance of the person fought with will mean that that relationship is not carrying a lot of tension. The pacing on it will sag. The reader will forget that they are supposed to care.

A thing that I said in the previous paragraph: figure out what each scene is doing. Not just one thing. If it’s just one thing, the pacing will sag and fall over. Do more. But also: when you revise, sometimes one of the things a scene used to be doing will change. If you rip out a subplot, remember to look at the scenes around the stuff you removed. It’s not just that you have to check to get the information redistributed. It’s that the beats also have to be redistributed. If that subplot contained the moments to breathe, your new pacing will be too frenetic. If that subplot contained mostly action and excitement, a hint of that needs to creep back into the new pacing. Pacing, sadly, is not just something you can do once and be done.

Stylistic and length changes. Word length, sentence length, paragraph length, chapter length. You can change these deliberately if you want to, but if you find you have subconsciously changed them without meaning to, you may be rushing a section or meandering through a section that will not feel integrated with the rest of the book and will nag at the reader–sometimes without them being able to spot why.

Note that you do not have to do length analysis on every element of every book every time. This is more a diagnostic for when something seems to not be working or if you consistently have problems than something every writer should do at every moment. In fact, all of this is in that category. If you’re finding that people are saying things you don’t really get about pacing, that something is not working and you don’t understand why, you can poke at these things (or at ideas people will offer in the comments, maybe!). But no writing tool is universal, this is not universal, and you should feel utterly free to not do any of this if you don’t need to and don’t feel like it.

I feel like I can’t stress enough in process posts that everybody works differently, because I hear enough conversation about “I heard one piece of advice and I thought I had to,” and seriously, no, you do not have to, you never have to. Do what works for you. Discard things that sound horrifying until/unless nothing else is working and you feel like it’s worth a shot. Try things that are exciting or weird, try things that feel like they’re fixing the problems you actually have, and don’t listen to me when you don’t feel like it. Okay? Okay.

(no subject)

Jun. 25th, 2017 11:26 am
the_rck: (Default)
[personal profile] the_rck
I used the c-PAP for three and a half hours last night. Right now, I'm sniffling and sneezing. I fear the two are connected. I washed the reservoir and nasal pillows pretty thoroughly on Friday. I didn't want to try to wash out the hose, but I think I'm going to have to because this makes three occasions when I've had severe allergies starting the morning after using the c-PAP.

I finished two fics yesterday. Well, one is certainly done, barring a thorough proofread. It's gen, so that's not nearly as hard to arrange as it might otherwise be. The other needs a second opinion if I can find someone willing given the moderately obscure fandom and the explicit and potentially squicky content. I've got a couple of people I can ask, but I was a little too fried last night to do it.

We went out for frozen lemonade at Sweetwaters last night. Sweetwaters gives coupons to the middle schools to hand out to every child who gets at least three A's on their final report card, and the school put the coupons in the envelopes with the report cards. Cordelia got hers and got a cinnamon roll. I got a frozen lemonade and a chocolate croissant. Scott got a ginger tea.

We finished that up a little after 8:00, and as we were just across the street from Plum Market, we went over there for the half price bakery goods.

It's been very cool, in the low 70s, so Scott opened a lot of our windows early yesterday afternoon. They stayed open all night and are still open. I don't think this relates to my sneezing because that didn't start until the windows had been open for about twenty hours.

Cordelia has been doing movie marathons. She's currently got about a dozen DVDs from the library. Of course, mostly what she's been doing is listening to her Hamilton CDs over and over (those were a gift from Scott's brother and his family). We listened to a little of that in the car last night, on the way to and from Sweetwaters. I still can't say that it does anything for me, but I'm glad Cordelia has something she's really passionate about.

Both of our Time Capsule storage drives are insisting that they're too full to allow backups. The program is supposed to delete old backups as needed in order to keep making current backups, and we have backups going back at least two years. At this point, anything from 2015 can absolutely go. One of the drives has a terabyte of storage, and the other has three. We have no idea what's going on to make them say they only have a few megabytes of space left. Scott thinks that wiping them is probably going to be necessary. We'll start with just one in case we need the backups on the other before we have clean backups on the first. Scott keeps saying that he needs a lot of time to do this and then getting cranky with me when I mention that it needs to be done (and later today he will be more cranky because I didn't make him do it while he had time).

Maybe he can figure out how to get Cordelia's laptop to backup via Time Machine, too. We've never managed that, and at this point, she's actually got stuff she'd be devastated to lose. It wasn't so important when she was seven.

(no subject)

Jun. 25th, 2017 12:34 pm
oursin: Brush the Wandering Hedgehog by the fire (Default)
[personal profile] oursin
Happy birthday, [personal profile] shana!

I now know

Jun. 24th, 2017 11:16 pm
james_davis_nicoll: (Default)
[personal profile] james_davis_nicoll
It takes roughly 3 hours to pack 4000 MMPB.

I had an amusing thought: donate them to UW, to keep the B. P. Nichol Library of Science Fiction company.

Much, much faster than I thought....

Jun. 24th, 2017 09:34 pm
conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly
So first, two signal boosts:

1. I found out about this via the League of Women Voters. This act, introduced in both the Senate and the House, has the stated purpose "To require States to automatically register eligible voters to vote in elections for Federal office, and for other purposes."

Among other things, it would automatically register eligible voters via information they provide to various government offices, such as the DMV. A number of states have take this kind of legislation up, and a few have passed it, but it would be wonderful to have this on a federal level, for all states.

It's S. 1353 in the Senate and H.R. 2876 in the House. Call your reps and ask them to support this act by co-sponsoring it.

What we're seeing right now in Washington with the AHCA is what happens when the elected officials are not sensitive to the needs of their constituents. To force them to care, we have to make it easier for those constituents to make their voices heard in the voting booth.


http://thisfinecrew.dreamwidth.org/98278.html

2. There is a new friending meme going around, so if you've already posted at [community profile] 2017revival and [community profile] addme and are still thinking "I need more people", you can try that. Boost it, anyway, would you? These things only work if they get shared.

Anyway, I want to get rid of my last few tabs, so bear with me.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


The Frog Log Saves Wildlife in Your Pool

Here's what happens when lightning doesn't hit the ground

The Last Picture Show

America’s Short-Lived ‘Black Army on Wheels’

What vampire bats can teach us about cooperation

The Green Energy Revolution Will Happen Without Trump

The fact is: Facts don’t matter to climate deniers

The Canadians helping refugees start anew

What's the Problem With Al Jazeera?

White People Keep Finding New Ways to Segregate Schools

London tower blocks evacuated as 34 buildings fail fire tests

Insurers Battle Families Over Costly Drug for Fatal Disease

Trump won't hire poor people for a top post - many Americans agree

Science Says Summer Is Going to Be Ruined for Many Years to Come

How Charlottesville, Virginia’s Confederate statues helped decimate the city’s historically successful black communities.

To Make Sense of American Politics, Immigrants Find Clues From Lands They Left

Venezuela's Maduro confronts perils of his reliance on the military

Bill Cosby Is Planning Town Halls About Sexual Assault And The Law, Spokesman Says (Gross!)

'No doesn't really mean no': North Carolina law means women can't revoke consent for sex

Nursing Home Workers Still Posting Nude and Vulgar Photos of Residents on Snapchat

Psychologists Open a Window on Brutal C.I.A. Interrogations
conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly
Took Finn to the groomer again. I like for him to look like people love him.

Last time, they just had to shave it all off. There wasn't much choice, and so they didn't ask what I wanted. I get that. This time they did ask. "Do you want him to look like a poodle?" "Isn't he already a poodle?"

Yes, but now he looks more like a poodle. I didn't think it was possible.

I've been amusing myself and occasionally annoying everybody else by crooning "You are so poodle-ful to meeeeeee" at him ever since.

*************************************************************


Why the Amish Are Building America’s RVs

To Remember Random Errands, Turn Them Into a Story

Teenage boy from Mumbai slum dances way to NY ballet school

A Serbian Farmer Wants To Protect The Balkan Donkey By Selling Its Pricey Milk

I am Lionfish, hear me ROAR!

Ramadan? There's an app for that.

The Once-Common Practice of Communal Sleeping

What Mormon Family Trees Tell Us About Cancer

America’s hungriest wind and solar power users: big companies

The unsustainable whiteness of green

Teens Are Having Sex Later, Using Contraception, CDC Finds

11 Ways That I, a White Man, Am Not Privileged (just read it)

How Europe could be the unexpected beneficiary of America’s fall from global grace

FEMA Is Preparing for a Solar Superstorm That Would Take Down the Grid

Turkish schools to stop teaching evolution, official says

Some U.S. States Relax Restrictions On Cladding Suspected In Grenfell Tower Fire

When twisted justice stops prisoners from starting over

A New, New Right Rises in Germany

Kurds see chance to advance their cause in ruins of Islamic State

America’s cultural divide runs deep. While rural and urban Americans share some economic challenges, they frequently diverge on questions of culture and values. On few issues are they more at odds than immigration.

How Accusing A Powerful Man of Rape Drove A College Student To Suicide

The Silence of the Lambs (This article is about child rape.)

As women go to jail in record numbers, who's watching out for their kids? No one.

Politics )

Science articles

Jun. 24th, 2017 01:30 pm
conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly
So, went out to walk the dogs earlier. Everything was going great, until Moonpie found a patch of grass. It looked to me to be identical to all the other patches of grass, but not to her....

Moonpie: YAY! Grass!
Me: C'mon, we're on our way home now!
Moonpie: Sure, sure, but hold on, I gotta roll around here.
Me: C'mon!
Moonpie: Busy flopping around like a dead fish!
Me: Indeed, you are.
Moonpie: LIKE A DEAD FISH!!!!
Finn: Smells good. Maybe I should take a leak.
Moonpie: LIKE A DEAD FISH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

We did eventually get home, where I found out that when Eva agreed to take out the compost for me in exchange for $7, she actually just dumped it on the ground sort of near the compost bin instead of actually in the bin. She's not getting her $7, and I don't care what she says, that's plenty fair.

**********************


While trust is inherited, distrust is not: study

Massive, ‘Dead’ Galaxy Puzzles Astronomers

Bioengineers create more durable, versatile wearable for diabetes monitoring

Legal or not, more American women are opting for abortion by medication. We asked doctors: How safe is it?

Self-folding origami: Chemical programming allows Nafion sheets to fold and refold

A Better Touch Screen, Inspired by Moth Eyes

Scientists spy on the secret inner life of bacteria

Sea sponges stay put with anchors that bend but don't break

Some clouds are full of little lollipop-shaped ice crystals

How did bird babysitting co-ops evolve?

Why Do Bird Eggs Come in So Many Shapes?

Saying 'climate change' instead of 'global warming' decreases partisan gap by 30 percent in U.S.

Wave beams mix and stir the ocean to create climate

Are you forgetful? That's just your brain erasing useless memories

Cancer cells may streamline their genomes in order to proliferate more easily

This glass frog wears its heart for all to see

How a wildfire kicked up a 45,000-foot column of flames

A 100-year-old physics problem has been solved

(no subject)

Jun. 24th, 2017 01:42 pm
the_rck: (Default)
[personal profile] the_rck
Cordelia is now saying that she doesn't want to go to camp in August because she doesn't think she can handle a week without me. She also says that she's sure all of the other kids will be awful people and that there will be so many people present that there's no hope of her managing to spend any time with the people she actually knows.

She's been wanting lots of hugs and cuddling and reassurance that I'll always be there for her. She's also afraid any time she lets herself stop and think (mostly in the evenings). Her days have been pretty full, but she comes home and tells me that, even though she had fun, she missed me horribly. I think she's got some sort of worry that, if she's not checking up on me regularly, I'll just vanish.

I finally listened to the voicemail Cordelia's psychiatrist left. She says that the Celexa ought to stay at a steady level for twenty four hours on a single dose and that this may mean the dose is too low. Cordelia is afraid of upping the dose because she's connected her tiredness to the medication. I need to call the doctor back on Monday to discuss it.

Cordelia has more or less mastered swallowing small pills. Last night, she asked what I take for cramps, and I gave her a naproxen. It took her two swallows to get it down, but she did, and she was astonished to discover that it did help.

Her report card came today. It's all A's with an A+ in gym and an A- in algebra. Cordelia's of the opinion that they can't have counted the algebra final in that grade because she thinks that would have taken her down to B+ or even B range. I can't tell from PowerSchool whether or not she's right. It doesn't actually matter. B grades are good, too, and that particular class has been nasty for all the students due to the teacher not being very good.

(no subject)

Jun. 24th, 2017 01:24 pm
the_rck: (Default)
[personal profile] the_rck
I wrote a lot yesterday, a bit more than 2300 words. I find that amazing given that I spent most of the day in a groggy haze, trying to figure out whether or not I had a window for napping.

Scott had to work 3 a.m. to 7 a.m. today. We got a call from the shift supervisor about half an hour after Scott went to bed. The guy wanted to make sure Scott knew he had to come in. He kept stumbling over what he was saying and talking in circles. I'm pretty sure that he had a script in mind for the call and that I blew it up by saying that Scott was in bed and couldn't come to the phone. Scott identified the caller simply based on my description of the guy's confusion.

I ended up staying up a bit later than I meant to because the writing was working well. For some reason, just the thought of needing to go to bed makes me able to produce words and plot and all of that. I think I slept a solid eight hours once I did go to bed, so there's that. I kind of want to go back to bed, though.

Scott has Monday scheduled off because it's our anniversary. I have a couple of minor errands that will be much easier if someone gives me a ride, so we'll deal with those. The rest of the day is ours. Cordelia is now saying that Scott and I should celebrate however we want, including without her, because it's our day. (She said something on the order of "I wasn't involved in your wedding.") This is a change from years past. I don't know that we'll leave her at home, but it's nice that, if we did, she'd be okay with it.

So our kitchen overhead fan broke

Jun. 24th, 2017 11:23 am
conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly
On the downside, it'll need to be replaced.

On the upside - or, shall I say, the bright side - we all loathe that light fixture. It only takes two bulbs and the cover over the bulbs means we're cooking in the dim all the time.

*************************************


'Superhero' 3D printed hands help kids dream in Argentina (I bet!)

All the Animals That Love Touchscreens

Georgia Sheriff To Cut Sentences For Inmates Who Saved Correctional Officer

On the trail with Cambodia's tarantula hunters

As drought looms, could this team of scientists prove cloud seeding works?

How Animals Develop Regional Accents

A surgeon’s secret: As she operated on babies’ birth defects, a doctor hid her own diagnosis

A School That Provides The One Constant In Homeless Children's Lives

Pride and prejudice? Race tinges LGBT celebrations

Supreme Court limits government's power to revoke citizenship

Where Street Vendors Run Pharmacies Out of Buckets

Military heads want transgender enlistment hold

A daily conundrum in convulsed Venezuela: will my kids make it to school?

Solar’s rise lifted these blue-collar workers. Now they’re worried about Trump

Senate GOP releases bill to cut Medicaid, alter 'Obamacare'

Children of Islamic State militants in Libya reunite with families in Khartoum

'Buried alive': the old men stuck in Britain’s prisons

Coffee under threat. Will it taste worse as the planet warms?

Ethiopia's Coffee Farmers Are 'On The Front Lines Of Climate Change'

Mounting evidence that Trump’s election was aided by Russian interference presents a challenge to the American system of government—with lasting consequences for democracy.

Rigged: Forced into debt. Worked past exhaustion. Left with nothing.

When the man who abuses you is also a cop.

How totalism works

Trained to Kill: How Four Boy Soldiers Survived Boko Haram (Skip this article if you have a sensitive stomach.)

Profile

adrian_turtle: (Default)
adrian_turtle

March 2016

S M T W T F S
   12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jun. 26th, 2017 03:30 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios